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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 739 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles, say for instance i have a case of like costco
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added in here for our dog lovers which there are countless many in the city and having an area where the dogs can play with their guardians and having a natural place for this to happen. you see all of the elements happening here and i want to thank
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ [dog barking] [rocket whistles] [boom] >> thank you for joining us tonight. i am the government policy director at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [ap
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around
, a waterfront design sensitive to the views and the environment that we want to have, and a great, great addition to our economy in the city for years and years to come, so it is with great pride that we make this announcement because many of the people in this room are looking for that opportunity from all walks of life, from every community in san francisco they see this as a city wide projected, not just on the waterfront. it's everybody's future. everybody has to be heard and i know that even this weekend there was a telephonic ability to talk to people online and the telephone. there were over 4,000 people that engaged themselves with a conversation and the warriors and about what this project meant. it's incredible. i also want to give a shout out to the port and i know monique is here and they're working hard with our team and continuing this ongoing dialogue and we will have more announcements to make. right now this is just the beginning of this project but it's a great beginning because usually when people talks about jobs and who gets to work on the project and i know su
bag battle. would a ban on the bags save the environment or trash thousands of local jobs? >>> we'll tell you about it. >>> wake up europe. >> millions of workers all across europe on strike tonight demonstrated in the streets in more than 20 countries all protesting against major government spending cuts. nearly half the nation's young people are out of work. maybe the protestors want the government to start creating more jobs. >>> riding on the dulles toll road is about to get more expensive. beginning in january the toll goes up from $1.50 to $1.75. tolls will rise from 75 cents to $1. in january 2014, the toll jumps to $2.75. these additional funds will go toward construction of the metro silver line. >>> another live look outside. topper is here after the break with the forecast. >>> law makers looking for answers on that deadly meningitis out break. how bad are plastic bags for our environment? experts from both sides weigh in in tonight's green alert. >>> law makers tonight digging for answers on the meningitis out break. the owner of the new england compounding center that
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to as
with the snowfall that it incorporated within it. one could liken glaciers as a depositional environment, a glacial environment. in the deposits are contained events of earth history that occur simultaneously during the depositional process. you see, ice sheets are essentially atmospheric processes. practically any material passing through the atmosphere may be trapped in glaciers as they form. pollen, volcanic ash, and meteorites have been discovered in the ice. even bubbles of ancient air have been found, representing a valuable record of earth's past atmosphere and climate. since the early 1970s, an international project has been underway to drill into greenland's vast continental glacier and obtain ice core samples. called the greenland ice core program, this effort involves scientists from countries around the world. the prime difficulties in a field operation such as drilling in ice relate primarily to the climate, the weather. it's not the best place to work, but it's overcome somewhat by the technique used today to excavate trenches and cover the tops of the trenches over with some form of
because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco
with eucalyptus trees. long paths allow you to meander, perfect for dog walking in a wooded environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty
's. the goal of staging is to create a neutral, audience-neutral environment where the buyer can imagine themselves without detracting by having your personal photographs on the walls or your grandmother's throw on the couch. you will notice that it is often neutral tones, nothing too dramatic, not very dramatic art. it is kind of like being in a hotel room. we have actually seen staging in some properties -- in some, it is still prop -- popular. in some markets, it is not even necessary on some properties. >> i think they are getting a little more daring with color. there is some color. because it is expensive -- if you get a stager that can use your furniture in your things, but just at it, as they say, and as james said about the landscaping, that is so important. you cannot leave your kids bikes. it is a whole thing. >> i ride my bike to work. i was riding to work and i saw someone had just repainted their front door. it was a beautiful yellow with a little orange in it. i was thinking, that did not cost very much, and now their house really jumps right out. simple thing. a red door.
a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and notic
down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore and to elevate the level of integrity and transparency at our city college. he demanded that of the other trustees as well as the administration . he went through some hard times as a trustee and shared with members here of the difficult years when things weren't as transparent as they should have been and integrity wasn't at the top of someone's mindful priorities but this is something he stood for. this is something him and his family stood for. as i know carolyn and her work on the status of woman an
of the room. it's basically used in hall of the hakkasans and that environment but i don't think it's a destination place for people to come as a club really. it's really to add environment to the people that are there, the guests that are there. >> just because when you do a new year's eve party and crank it up. >> if they can hear it over in union square i would be surprised. i spent many years at the st. francis hotel. i know what it gets like. >> any other comments? >> i thought kearney street could use more nightlife and everything closes after that and there are a couple of businesses there and it's exciting that you're coming in and bringing vitality to street life -- not street life but walking in and out of your doors. >> thank you commissioner. we're pretty excited about that too and we will be in las vegas and los angeles after that as well. las vegas is a 70,000 square foot club. that is quite different. >> thank you. any questions from the public? yes. >> well good evening commissioners. i am also a long time 22 year resident and i want to discuss and also presen
and the department of the environment is here as well (railroad noise). >> yes and all positive activities. the railway station is historic and it will remain that way, so again welcome to heron's head park. by the way for those of you who don't know why it's named this way is because if you ever have a chance to get above this area and see it literally is shaped like a heron's head and this is part of the honoring of our waterfront area. it's a great investment and of course it will lead me to say with the responsible, and this year is our proposition b which extends another great investment of $195 million to many other areas including the south east sector of open space that we got to take care of, and modernize. this is what rec and park does very well with dpw with all of the capital leadership in the city that i got to work on with the city administrator. we need to take care of the infrastructure in many ways and we are loving our parks and why we want this great investment to continue and this is another small yet important addition. we will have $35 million more of that with t
: construction? >> yes. there are opportunities to improve the built environment that surrounds those sros. i think that in mix of housing and population, we want to improve the character and a lot of fabric. i want to work to bring in this population growth and advocate for individuals that have been there for a while, that they will stay there. their lives will get better. they won't be pushed aside. they will be able to enjoy the improvements in that area. >> [indiscernible] >> i know currently there is the waldon house and the hay/ashbury clinic have merged. they have an office in mission street. there are a number of service providers on market street aside from the center, like lion martin health clinic and ucsf alliance. >> supervisor kim: i'm glad that you know the organizations but do you work with them? do you interface with people that are also low income? >> i do particularly with my work in the department at the center. oftentimes i am not only working with people that start businesses but people come looking for services who may need some assistance in finding pa
studying the b.p. case and the relationship between business and the environment. how important is today's set element -- settlement. >> this is the biggest story.no. we have more dollars at stake. >> in terms of how importantthil us a little more. it's a record settlement. but it does encompass quite a few different features. in addition to the felony charges there is the fec investigation and the resolution of that matter and that is a big deal. >> darren is saying it's notove. the government is bringing gross negligence charges against bp. bp is going to fight it vigorously how is that going to play out? >> it's difficult for them toave standard when they admitted to the felony charges. when it's related to the environment. it's some $20 billion this is a big story but it's an even bigger story ahead. >> there have been so many fines there a silver lining to all of this? does this make the deep water drilling safer going into the future? >> well it's certainly a goodstr investors and the shareholders will see the company in a greater light. brrchltbut unfortunately we aret going to se
carbon emissions and achieve a sustainable environment. for instance this requires all new buildings designed to meet the gas reduction goals. that means more than 6 million square feet of commercial space and 11,000 housing units all in the development pipeline have been designed using these principles. [applause] in fact san francisco was recently recognized by the world green building council as having the greenest building policy by any local level in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has won smartest building in the wo
neuroscience, all the underpinnings of these skills are formed in the environments in which children, babies grow up. i spent a lot of time with a pediatrician in san francisco who is watching how to improve environments for kids but a lot of folks also take place in schools dealing with adolescence when those qualities become character. in different ways, different educator's from a chess teacher in brooklyn to a private school principal in new york city to mentors working in the highest poverty neighborhood in chicago, trying to give students the sort of support and help they need to do better in this realm. mostly we don't quite know how to teach these francs, how to help kids improve. what i write about in this book is an experiment, new innovative ideas that might be able to help kids do better in this dimension and in the process help them do better in high school and college and life. >> i am going to follow up beach author's introduction with one quick question and get to the next topic. you wrote a book a few years ago while you were reporting for the new york times on the harlem ch
recommendation, without objection. item two. >> resolution authorizing department of environment a grant of 400,000 from united states department of environmental protection for preparing cleanup plans for potentially contaminated areas in southeast san francisco in support of the bluegreenway project for period of october 1st, 2012 through october 31, 2015. >> supervisor chu, supervisor avalos, mr. rodriguez, department of environment. we are here seeking your support of the resolution. it is a grant the department received from the epa to continue our brownfield project effort in the bay view and hunter's point community. this will allow us to go out and inventory brownfield sites, do site assessment, preliminary work and identify properties for potentially linking the blue greenway project to it. this is in partnership with port of san francisco, parks alliance in order to open up greater access to the southeastern waterfront . in addition this was announced with the epa as a companion effort. the epa awarded 400,000 in workforce training to hunter's park family and workforce for collaborati
street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch what is going to emerge.
're are in this environment and network participatory environment and our students need the tools. they need social emotional learning is a key tool and technical and literacy and media is behavioral so this has just been a fantastic day. thanks to all for coming and thank you everybody. i just want to share one piece of data which i don't understand completely. maybe our friend from facebook can explain, his twitter colleagues what they do. a hash tag was created and "stop bullying sf barb and hash tag and generated 3 million personal impressions and 1.3 million followers within the last 24 hours. [applause] isn't that incredible? we talked about some of the dangers in social media today and i guess that's part of the beauty of social media and the video is part of that as well, so on behalf of all the childrens and families and parents and communities in the district i want to thank everybody for coming for all the work that you do. i feel optimistic in all of work that you do. thank you and go forth and do great work. >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st cen
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
know the basic military training environment is highly susceptible to the abuse of power, with established institutional safeguards to prevent misconduct by instruct druce. these safeguards are designed to dissuade misconduct very strong as sharp or selection screening and training process and to deter misconduct are an effective system of detection and accountability. leaders play a critical role because they must constantly monitor safeguards for weaknesses and make corrections as necessary. moreover, training is struck druce had a responsibility to uphold our core values and hold themselves accountable for helping to detect those who violate our standards. in a properly functioning system that minimizes misconduct, most instructors will be dissuaded from inappropriate behavior and a few who are not will be detected and held accountable for their actions. leadership will have good insight into the effect of miss that the institutional safeguards and the instruct druce will police themselves. returning now to the three questions of what happened in basic literary trainin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 739 (some duplicates have been removed)